1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar

like they are from a trustworthy brand (such as Yahoo!, eBay or Citigroup), but they’re really not—they are spammers that are "phishing" in hopes that you will submit your personal account information. Yahoo!, Microsoft and other industry leaders are currently testing solutions to e-mail forgery and phishing that will put an end to these fraudulent activities. ASTA’s proposal also recommends a number of ways that you can help in the fight, including: installing or enabling firewalls on PCs, using anti-virus software and other screening tools to detect incoming viruses and harmful or suspicious codes, making use of spam filtering technologies that Internet companies offer and customizing settings that provide the appropriate level of protection needed. In addition, Yahoo! Mail helps increase consumer awareness by outlining the following anti-spam tips and tools at http://antispam.yahoo.com - Protect your email address – treat it like your phone number – by using disposable e-mail addresses - Never send your password, credit card numbers or other personal information - Don’t post your email address in public places - Never respond to unsolicited email What has the government been doing in the fight against spam? Even the government has jumped in to help fight the Spam wars. On January 1, 2004, the federal CAN-SPAM Act went into effect, which called for the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to study whether or not a National Do-Not-E-mail Registry (modeled after the "do-not-call" list for telemarketers) was warranted. But in June 2004, the FTC advised Congress that, at the present time, a National Do Not E-mail Registry would fail to reduce the amount of spam consumers receive. It might even increase it, and it could not be enforced effectively without creating an e-mail authentication system to prevent spammers from evading spam filters and law enforcement. In August 2004, The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) moved to prevent cell phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs) from becoming the next major target for e-mail spam. The FCC issued rules requiring marketers to have explicit permission from wireless-device users before they can be sent any commercial e-mail on their phones or PDAs. It also urged the industry to develop technologies to prevent spam from taking over wireless devices the way it has on computers. This is great news for all of you cell phone

Colleges

 

 

Colleges