The name is Manson, Shirley Manson, and when the new James Bond film The World is Not Enough hits screens world wide this winter, Manson, who is the lead vixen of the post-industrial superband Garbage, will be the one singing Bond's theme song (with the help of an 83-piece orchestra they used to help record the track).

Yet while being picked to croon the theme seems like the ultimate in golden opportunities, Manson insists it was more like destiny for her famed four-piece.

"We've always wanted to do a Bond theme, literally from the first day we came together it was something we could do justice to. A lot of it has to do with the sound of my voice - it's quite lower than some of the girls who have done Bond themes in the past - they have all had sort of girlie voices," she says. "I also think the way the Bond songs are put together is sort of the same as the way we put songs together, in that you take something that is essentially traditional with some technological and classical elements - something that seems very pop-oriented and easy to digest at the surface, but if you dig deeper, should you wish, there are sort of threads in a darker vein."

The video is already in circulation on MTV, and soon enough Garbage will also be in circulation via MTV as they ready to headline MTV's fall College Invasion Tour in support of last year's multi-platinum album Version 2.0.

"We wanted to come and tour the States before we quit this whole cycle, and we were tying to put a tour together at the same time as MTV approached us to see if we wold be interested in doing the Campus Invasion. Seeing as how we have such a huge following in the schools around America we thought it would make a really good package for our fans," Manson says.

The College Invasion Tour also includes Orange County rockers Lit (you know, those guys in the bowling video) and a free interactive daytime festival with booths where concert-goers watch videos, play Playstation games, try out to be part of The Real World cast or even learn how to mix and sc-sc-sc-scratch records with lessons provided by a guest DJ.

As hard as it is to believe, the College Invasion gig will be Garbage's first ever college-oriented tour. "Sometimes these things just don't work out. Sometimes when we're touring, the colleges aren't in session or vice versa, and this is the first time it has just sort of clicked for our schedule. It's great because we know that a groundswell of our support comes from the colleges and universities of America, and this seems like a great way to finish up the tour." No kidding. We just hope they really bond with the students on the tour.

MTV Campus Invasion Tour Dates
11/16 Southern Methodist U.
11/17 Steven F. Austin U.
11/20 U. of Arizona
11/22 Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo
11/23 UC San Diego
11/24 UC Irvine

The new Live album comes at you like a rip tide - it washes you out, drags you under and never lets you up for air. Sounds pretty ominous, but when you consider the lyrical content of Distance to Here, Live's fourth LP, you realize the album actually has a massively positive message. Just ask Ed Kowalczyk, the band's eccentric and compassionate frontman. He says the new record is all about being more positive and loving - a message he says makes the new record unique and worthwhile, especially to America's youth. "What is ultimately hopeful about the state of things is that we are an incredibly intelligent generation because of all of the exposure we've had to things and the sheer amount of information. I think we're on the cusp of being able to incarnate a powerful group of people who combine intelligence, love and compassion for the world. But I think we need more and more art - even more rock 'n' roll - to create a soundtrack for moving on in love and in positivity." Not only does Kowalczyk talk the talk, but he'll walk the walk with his upcoming tour which will bring his soundtrack of positive love vibes to college venues. "It's important to us with this fall U.S. tour to reintegrate with our fans on a real basic level and that takes place in smaller venues," he says. "It's really important for us to get out there and see people face to face with this record."

Live Tour Dates
11-16 Orono, Maine Alfond Arena
11-18 Boston, Mass. Orpheum Theatre
11-19 New York City Hammerstein Ballroom
11-21 Upper Darby, Penn. Tower Theater
12-31 Hershey, Penn. Hershey Arena

"In a couple of years it won't just be David Bowie out there like a fruit loop being Captain Internet," warns Warner Bros. recording artist Jude, who predicts the Internet will soon become a powerful tool for rock bands to use to expand both their fan base and their creative potential. Jude is just one of several artists who have signed up to be a part of the all-college MP3 tour which is currently trekking across the country, spreading the word about the musical power of the Web. Also on board for a number of dates on the tour are less-than-techno-savvy rockers The Goo Goo Dolls. Bassist Robby Takac admits that he and the rest of the Goos have been "slow moving into computers," but adds that "the availability of people being able to receive things directly into their homes is going to make some changes in the music industry, so when [MP3] approached us about this tour we thought it would be a pretty good way of getting involved with it early on." The tour, which has already passed through colleges like the U. of Illinois, Penn State U., Temple U. and the U. of Florida and is heading for UC Davis and UC Irvine, will continue through the new millennium. The revolution, these artists predict, has only just begun.

MP3 Music and Technology Tour Dates
Nov. 17 The Pit U. of New Mexico
Nov. 18 Universal - Irvine U. of California, Irvine
Nov. 19 RIMAC Arena U. of California, San Diego

The Counting Crows / This Desert Life / DGC•Geffen•Interscope
Once again, the Counting Crows have constructed a masterpiece by poking around in frontman Adam Duritz's emotional wounds. But there's a new twist this side of the Band-aid thanks to Cracker frontman David Lowery who served as producer. Lowery's hillbilly rock sensibility helps the Crows recover from 1996's melancholy and paranoid Recovering the Satellites by pushing up the tempo (save a few trademark ballads). The band's first single "Hangingaround" is perhaps their most spirited yet, and the rousing "Mrs. Potter's Lullaby" is a perfectly singable companion to the long-loved "Mr. Jones." - A

Fiona Apple / When the Pawn… / Epic Records
The title to Fiona Apple's new LP is 90 words long (we counted twice). Though it seems unpractical, there is a subtle brilliance in the title poem that precedes the young siren's sophomore (not sophomoric) collection. The new, lengthy-titled long player isn't short on Apple's trademark abrasive, emotional lyricism, but this time around her outpouring is matched with equal parts of producer Jon Brion's eclectic instrumentation - which incorporates everything from synthesizers to a Wurlitzer. The result is a record that, like all good poetry, is both controlled and ambiguous - powerful and decidedly more mature than her last effort. - A

Big Bad Voodoo Daddy / This Beautiful Life / Interscope Records
Don't bother to tell the six-piece Southern Cali swing band Big Bad Voodoo Daddy that swing has already swung out of fashion. On the sixth cut off their second CD, This Beautiful Life, crooner Scotty Morris beats you to the punchline. "Things have changed / And they are only getting better." Indeed. On This Beautiful Life, these hippest of all hip-cats maintain their smoky swagger and rely heavily on their horn-driven blend of swing that's so much damn fun it'll make you wish it was 1998 all over again. - B

Stone Temple Pilots / No. 4 / Atlantic Records
STP frontman Scott Weiland's drug addiction has him currently behind bars, and in 1996 it cost him his band as they left him and formed the horrible and now dead Talk Show. On STP's straightforward fourth LP the depletion of their leading man is chronicled with the jarring and abrasive lyrics and music we have come to expect from the tormented quartet. Yet while his drug addiction may keep Weiland pinned down, sometimes there is remarkable lyrical and musical freedom to be found in the caged bird's desperate, grinding cry. - B+

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